Distinguished Professorships and Endowed Chairs

reprinted from Issue 15, Fall 2012 of Frontiers of Medicine (PDF)

Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD, MAS

Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD, MAS

Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD, MAS was appointed the director of the UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center (CVP).

In addition, Bibbins-Domingo was appointed the first recipient of the Lee Goldman endowed Chair. Lee Goldman, MD, currently the dean of the faculties of Health Sciences and Medicine and executive vice president for Health and Biomedical Sciences at Columbia University, served as chair of the UCSF Department of Medicine from 1995 to 2006. A number of donors, including Alan Kates and David and Cecelia Lee, created the endowed chair to carry on Goldman’s commitment to cardiac clinical epidemiology, especially in at-risk patients and vulnerable populations.

Bibbins-Domingo’s current work focuses on understanding the interaction among social, behavioral and biological factors that place vulnerable groups at risk for cardiovascular disease early in life, and population-wide policy interventions that may prevent disease in these groups. She was also recently appointed director of the CVP, which is dedicated to improving health and reducing disparities through discovery, innovation, policy, advocacy and community partnerships.

Bibbins-Domingo earned a PhD in biochemistry, a medical degree and a master’s degree in clinical research, all at UCSF, where she also completed her residency training.

Christine S. Ritchie, MD, MSPH

Christine S. Ritchie, MD, MSPH

Christine S. Ritchie, MD, MSPH, was appointed as the first recipient of the Harris Fishbon Distinguished Professorship in Clinical Translational Research in Aging, which was created through a unique collaboration among UCSF, the Harris Fishbon Fund and the Jewish Home of San Francisco. She will lead the development of a UCSF research program, located at the Jewish Home of San Francisco, to improve the care and quality of life of older adults by translating research findings into clinical benefits for older adults with serious illnesses.

Ritchie was recruited from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she held numerous leadership positions. Her research focuses on advanced illness and multimorbidity, care transitions, supportive care in cancer and other serious illnesses, and informatics and emerging technology in chronic disease management. She is a graduate of the University of North Carolina Medical School, Chapel Hill. She completed her training in internal medicine and a fellowship in geriatric medicine from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and a master of science in Public Health.

Margaret Tempero, MD

Margaret Tempero, MD

Margaret Tempero, MD, was appointed as the first recipient of the Rombauer Family Distinguished Professorship in Pancreas Cancer Clinical and Translational Science. The professorship was created through the generosity of Koerner Rombauer, whose wife, Joan, received care from Tempero, and their children, Sheana and K.R.

Tempero earned her master’s degree in clinical pathology, and medical degree, and completed her internal medicine residency and oncology fellowship, at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. She served on the faculty there until her recruitment to UCSF in 2000, where she served as chief of medical oncology and deputy director of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is currently the director of the UCSF Pancreas Center.




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