Medical Education

Updated May 2015

                                                                                             

Gastroenterology

Faculty name: Justin Sewell, MD, MPH, FACP

Contact information: justin.sewell@ucsf.edu

Subspecialty/research focus: gastroenterology, cognitive load theory

Title/description of research projects: I am currently pursuing a PhD in Health Professions Education through the UCSF-U Utrecht Doctoral Program.  In the course of my doctoral work, I am working on several projects related to "cognitive load theory" as it pertains to colonoscopy training.  Cognitive load theory basically holds that human working memory can only manage a finite number of informational elements at one time.  When there are too many informational elements (i.e., the cognitive load is too high), the brain becomes overloaded, which results in poor performance and learning.  I have developed an instrument that accurately measures cognitive load, and I am very interested in adapting this instrument for use in other medical education settings. I also have skills and expertise to mentor trainees on other medical education projects.

Website: See my UCSF Profiles page for more details (http://profiles.ucsf.edu/justin.sewell)


General Internal Medicine

Faculty name: Calvin Chou, MD, PhD 

Contact information: calvin.chou@ucsf.edu
                                    Voice mail: 415-221-4810 x2740
                                    Campus mail: VAMC 111

Subspecialty/research focus: Medical Education

Title of research projects: I have five areas of inquiry where residents would be welcome and could contribute significantly.

  • Delineating the relationship between communication and professionalism: In collaborative work with Anna Chang and Karen Hauer on developing a curriculum in remediation, it has become increasingly clear that students identified as having deficits in communication skills may also (or instead) have professionalism issues. There is ample literature that connects communication and professionalism, but there is no paper that explicitly and formally links the two. The student/resident would conduct a literature review, gaining important fundamental skills in systematic and critical analysis of the literature, with the goal of preparing a manuscript for publication.
  • Literature review of effective teaching behaviors and curricula for physical examination skills: Som Mookherjee (Dept of Hospital Medicine, Parnassus) and I are embarking on a narrative literature review of physical examination curricula to examine the features that will effectively move early medical students from the comprehensive approach of gathering information to a more targeted, reasoning-based approach. The student/resident would conduct a literature review, gaining important fundamental skills in systematic and critical analysis of the literature, with the goal of preparing a manuscript for publication.
  • Completing a survey study of medical student comfort levels and partnering practices in co-ed settings: Kali Stanger (UCSF class of 2009) and I are working on analyzing data from one medical school class about their relative comfort with practicing on co-ed peers. The data has been collected; the resident would complete the data analysis, and critically analyze how this study adds to the literature (most recent lit review done in 2008). The project is very near completion; the goal is to edit and complete a manuscript for publication.
  • Analyzing how the impact of student feedback to faculty can be enhanced: Marieke Kruidering (Dept of Pharmacology) and I have recently published a manuscript showing that feedback from students to faculty improves soon after the institution of a curriculum in feedback but slowly devolves in specificity over time. The decrease in specificity is wholly attributable to the loss over time of positive specific feedback. There are two sub-projects, both potentially publishable, that grow from this initial study (students/residents may choose one or both to work on):
    a. We are currently undertaking a follow-up study in which we electronically remind first-year students to remain specific in their positive feedback. The student/resident would gain experience in qualitative analysis by helping with the analysis of the impact of these electronic reminders on specific feedback in MS1s' evaluations of faculty lectures, using a previously-established rubric we developed.
    b. How do faculty actually use evaluations that students write of their teaching? There is surprisingly no literature addressing this question. Students/residents would work with us to develop a list of open-ended and closed-ended questions for faculty, help us select the types of faculty to interview, conduct focus groups or individual interviews, and analyze quantitative and qualitative data.

Determining the impact of the VALOR Program: VALOR is a six-month longitudinal clerkship based at the VA in which cohorts of students rotate through surgery, medicine, neurology, and psychiatry. VALOR is currently the highest-rated such program at UCSF, and there are a number of projects related to individual components of VALOR that can be studied. VALOR students have written narratives on what patients have taught them during the program, and these are ripe for qualitative analysis. VALOR students undergo a mini-curriculum in professional development and career choice using a structured inquiry model that has not yet been described. Finally, as VALOR students graduate, tracking where they have matched for residency and determining the effect of their training at the VA will be of great interest, both to the School of Medicine as well as to the VA. Please contact me for further details about the directions in which these projects may develop.

Career Counseling for Medical Students: To describe a novel method of helping medical students choose their eventual careers. The trainee(s) would interview MS4's who have undergone the counseling to determine their satisfaction with the method, the limitations, and follow the eventual outcomes.


Faculty name: Madhavi Dandu, MD, MPH

Contact information: dandum@medicine.ucsf.edu

Subspecialty/research focus: Global Health and Medical Education

Title/description of research projects: I have several projects available for trainees interested in global health education in curriculum development for health professional as well as in development of evaluation tools.


Faculty name: Gurpreet Dhaliwal, MD

Contact information: gurpreet.dhaliwal@va.gov
                                    415-221-4810 x 4150

Subspecialty/research focus: case reports; diagnostic dilemma cases; analysis of clinical problem solving/diagnostics


Faculty name: Kathy Julian, MD

Contact information: Kathy.julian@ucsf.edu

Subspecialty/research focus: Medical education

Title/description of research projects: I have many potential education projects. They focus on resident curriculum development, clinic design, faculty development, teaching residents to teach, and resident education.


Faculty name: Karen Hauer, MD

Contact information: Karen.hauer@ucsf.edu,
                                   476-1964

Subspecialty/research focus: Medical education, student and resident competence assessment, EPAs, clinical skills, longitudinal integrated clerkships, remediation

Title/description of research projects:

I have ongoing projects designed to study methods of assessing students’ and resident’ competence to explore the most effective ways to assess complex patient care skills and provide feedback to learners. This information can help trainees and their teachers about development of skills over time. As Internal Medicine Clerkship Director, I am also interested to work with residents who have their own projects ideas related to medical student learning.


Faculty name: Patricia O’Sullivan, MD

Contact information: 415 514 2281 
                                   Patricia.osullivan@ucsf.edu

Subspecialty/research focus: Medical education

Title/description of research projects: Development of Faculty Developers. Dr. David Irby and I are undertaking a series of studies about faculty development. The first have focused on the developers themselves. In the future we will focus on organizational and contextual influences.

Development of reflective skills. Drs. Louise Aronson, Marieke Kruidering and I have undertaken a series of studies to develop a measure of reflective ability, a method to teach reflection and to educate faculty on giving feedback about reflective ability. With the focus on milestones we need to examine the effect of incorporating reflection on the resident’s progression on milestones.


Faculty name: Michael Rabow, MD

Subspecialty/research focus: Palliative Care, End-of-life care, Medical Education, Professional Development, Humanity in Medicine

Title of research project:

Primary Palliative Care Education

An ongoing research project to assess primary palliative care education needs among physician learners (medical students, residents, fellows, attending) and non-physician learners (nurses, chaplains, social workers) as well as to access and develop curricula to train front-line UCSF clinicians in the basics of palliative care.  This project is integrated with Primary Palliative Care initiatives in the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

 


Faculty name: Brad Sharpe, MD

Contact information: 415-514-2198 (office)
                                    415-443-0989 (pager)
                                    sharpeb@medicine.ucsf.edu

Subspecialty/research focus: Hospital Medicine
                                                  Community-acquired pneumonia
                                                  Healthcare-associated pneumonia
                                                  Oral Case Presentations
                                                  Medical Education
                                                  Faculty Development

Title of research project:

Oral Case Presentations
I am part of a multi-center group studying oral case presentations as there is minimal literature on how to do these well or how to teach them. We have done multiple surveys of faculty trying to determine "best practices" for oral case presentations for 3rd-year students. I am interested in figuring out what makes a "great presentation" and how to teach this skill more effectively.


Faculty name: Rebecca Shunk, MD

Contact information: Rebecca.Shunk@va.gov

Subspecialty/research focus: Interprofessional Education

Title/description of research projects:

My research efforts are in curriculum development and assessment in both undergraduate and graduate medical education with an emphasis more recently on interprofessional collaboration and the Patient Centered Medical Home Model. Early in my career I focused on the cardiac physical exam and still do that work. I am currently the Director of a Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education.  In this role my team and I are currently developing an interprofessional model of ambulatory team-based care for internal medicine residents and nurse practitioner students along with pharmacy, psychology, social work, dietetic, podiatry and psychiatry trainees. We have many opportunities to look at how interprofessional trainees can train and care for patients together.


Geriatrics/Public and Reflective Writing

Faculty name: Louise Aronson, MD, MFA

Contact information: 415-514-3154
                                   aronsonl@medicine.ucsf.edu

Subspecialty/research: Geriatrics/Medical Education, Reflective learning, Public Medical Writing and Communication

Title/description of research projects:

Promoting reflection in medical students: Randomized trial of narrative vs structured approaches
4 year study of inter professional faculty development course

Evaluation of inter professional faculty standardized patient exercise 

Study of impact of narrative advocacy course on op-ed and perspectives publications by students, residents and faculty

20 year review of narrative essays in top 3 medical journals


Hospital Medicine

Faculty name: Marcia Glass, MD

Contact information: mglass@medicine.ucsf.edu
                                    504-214-9978

Subspecialty/research focus: Palliative care/Medical Ethics/Global Health

Title/description of research projects:

Simulation Project in Medical Ethics for Global-Health Students

Rounding Revamp Project


Faculty name: Bradley Monash, MD

Contact information: o: 415-476-5928; p: 415-443-0010; c: 857-366-2414
                                   Bradley.Monash@ucsf.edu

Subspecialty/research focus: Medical education, Clinical Reasoning, Rounds

Title/description of research projects:

1) Rounds - I am involved in multiple projects exploring trainee and patient interaction with daily rounds on the medicine service. In 2013 we conducted a 3-month RCT on the medicine service, studying a standardized, bedside rounding model. We accumulated mounds of data, some of which remains untouched. We are in the process of writing up 3 manuscripts (led by myself, Nader Najafi and Yile Ding), and could engage trainees in any level of study development or dissemination.

2) Clinical Reasoning - I am a National Correspondent for the Journal of Hospital Medicine and help to recruit and shepherd case write-ups for the clinical problem-solving (JHM Clinical Care Condrums) series. Ideal cases should follow the TEACH mnemonic (Teaching points can be made, Enigma - the answer cannot be obvious, Answer must be definitely known, Cool and interesting - readers should say "wow" at the end, Honest - cannot change facts). Cases are divided up into 6-8 clinical "aliquots" and presented sequentially to an expert discussant.


Medical Education

Faculty name: Molly Cooke, MD

Contact information: 415-514-2282
                                   mcooke@medicine.ucsf.edu

Subspecialty/research: Focus medical education

Title/description of research projects:

I am completing a book on medical education, along with colleagues Dave Irby and Bridget O'Brien; publication is anticipated in mid-2008. Working on the book has provided me with a strong command of the theoretical frameworks supporting educational innovations in workplace/clinical learning and a broad grounding in the empirical literature. As I return from sabbatical I am re-engaging with a wide variety of educational program development projects at both the undergraduate and residency level. I am able to assist residents with relatively defined research interests to realize their own research project. In addition, I have a detailed understanding of the entire curriculum and am aware of many opportunities for a resident interested in medical education to participate in program development, assist with assessment and/or conduct research in either undergraduate or graduate level medical education.


Faculty name: Karen Hauer, MD

Contact information: Karen.hauer@ucsf.edu
                                    476-1964    

Subspecialty/research focus: Medical education, student and resident competence assessment, EPAs, clinical skills, longitudinal integrated clerkships, remediation

Title/description of research projects:

I have ongoing projects designed to study methods of assessing students’ and resident’ competence to explore the most effective ways to assess complex patient care skills and provide feedback to learners. This information can help trainees and their teachers about development of skills over time. As Internal Medicine Clerkship Director, I am also interested to work with residents who have their own projects ideas related to medical student learning.


Faculty name: Lindsay Mazotti
                         Lindsay.mazotti@ucsf.edu

Research focus: Medical education; hospital transitions of care

Title/description of research projects: I have a few projects ongoing.
Multiple curricular and assessment/evaluation projects for longitudinal third year clerkship PISCES; working on project to improve patient communication at hospital discharge; piloting a clinic project at Mt. Zion. Happy to assist resident in initiating own project as well- either in med education or involving transitions in care. Many options exist in the PISCES clerkship for projects as well.


Faculty name: Rebecca Shunk, MD

Subspecialty/research focus: Physical Exam Instruction Internal Medicine-Curriculum Development/Cardiac.

Title of research project: An ECG and Cardiac Physical Exam Curriculum for Residents.

Brief description of research project: We are implementing a computer based cardiac physical exam training module to our established curriculum and looking and its availability to improve resident learning on the cardiac physical exam.


Faculty name: Arianne Teherani, PhD
                        Assistant Professor
                        UCSF School of Medicine
                        Box 0410

Subspecialty/research focus: My research is in medical education. Specifically, my focus is on clinical learning, cognitive learning, and professionalism.

Title of research project: Presently have multiple research projects.


Faculty name: Maria Wamsley, MD
                         maria.wamsley@ucsf.edu

Subspecialty focus: Focus General Internal Medicine
                                  Medical Education Research

Research focus/brief description: Interprofessional Standardized Patient Exercise - I am working with faculty from the Schools of Nursing, Dentistry, PT and Pharmacy to develop and implement a standardized patient exercise for an interprofessional group of learners. The resident would work with us to develop the SP case and assist in data collection and analysis. This would be an opportunity to gain expertise in writing a standardized patient case and in analyzing curricular evaluation data. Potential for presentation at national meetings as well as for publication.

Chronic Illness Curriculum - We implemented a chronic illness curriculum in 2007 at UCSF. We have collected outcomes data that is mostly quantitative. The resident's role would be to assist in the analysis of data and preparation of a manuscript for publication.